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20130422
20130422
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. >>brian: joining us with more on this technology taken from above, anna kooiman. >> good morning. they are stunning, these images. they were taken while taking tsarnaev into custody. you can see in the video released by the massachusetts state police, the 19-year-old in the boat, that image you see there is his body highlighted to thermal imaging. police were able to monitor his every movement because of this technology. now watch this. those big black puffs, those are explosions believed to be the flash grenades police threw at him. the company that makes the thermal cameras said the equipment worked exactly how it was supposed to. >> i think it was a real win they could look through the cover and see him lying inside the technology has been around for decades, but as you can see it keeps getting better and better. flare has more than 100 cameras in law enforcement communities. that is all around the world, not just here in the u.s. >>gretchen: thanks for that update. so much more information coming out in the last 48 hours after the killing and then the capture of the suspects.
technology with night vision. making it easy for drivers to see. and night vision is the first advanced pedestrian detection vision. this video shows how it works. with headlights already showing this system with an infrared night- vision camera. it sends its imagery to the camera that spesenses special pedestrians. this result improve tonight division is displayed on a television monitor in the dashboard. and if this is spotted it will flash of yellow warnings. here is a comparison. the lower is the night vision. is it definitely it easier. and here it is again. in this example the person is revealed walking a dog on left side see them on the top portion. here is a second. this is offered in high-end luxury vehicles. it should be available in most cars for five, 10 years. >> here is a nice shot from san jose. beautiful scenes from santa clara, san jose with clear skies and we are seeing those nice conditions around the bay area. once we can see the cartagena's bridge. through alamo, hercules and temperatures in the '70s. for tomorrow look for another warm day. just like what we had tod
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
and the technology used by law enforcement to take tsarnaev into custody. night vision cameras spotted him hiding in a boat. and flash-bang grenades were used to stun and disorient him. all this while the city of boston prepares to say good-bye to one of the victims. krystle campbell. she's one of three people who died in last monday's marathon attack. joining us right now is boston's police commissioner. he has been right in the middle of this all. ed davis, thank you so much for joining us. i really appreciate it. >> good morning. >> commissioner, what can you tell me about dzhokhar tsarnaev's condition right now? >> he's in serious but stable condition at the beth israel hospital. we have officers who are guarding him. he -- he's progressing at this point. >> you say he is progressing. is he communicating with investigators right now? >> those -- there have been widely published reports that he is. i wouldn't dispute that but i don't have any specific information on that myself. >> you say you wouldn't dispute that. of course we understand he's been sedated, intubated. has he been able to comm
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4